Friday, December 15, 2017

Army Spc. Keisha M. Morgan

February 8, 2011 by  
Filed under Killed in Action, Most Recent Posts

Army Spc. Keisha M. Morgan
KIA: February 22, 2008
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Assigned to the Division Special Troops Battalion, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas

AWV’s Facebook Memorial Page

Comments

12 Responses to “Army Spc. Keisha M. Morgan”
  1. Diana Morgan says:

    I am Keisha’s mother….Wow this has been up since February 8th and I am the 1st one with a comment.

    I guess that truth be told people do forget.
    But I have not…..
    I think about my daughter everyday.
    I want to know who took her young life away from her.
    It was not fair to her…..
    And how the army helped to cover it up by saying it was a suicide. Anyone that knew her knew that she would never kill herself….
    I know that GOD will repay….but whoever you are, wherever you are I hope that you will someday have some remorse…..and tell who you are—you not only took Keisha from me but from her f’iance, her entire family and all the other people that loved her………………………

  2. Crystal Colon says:

    Mrs. Morgan, Rest assured that your daughter has not been forgotten. I think about her often, and I wonder about the strange circumstances of her death. I met Keisha in basic training back in 2004, but our contact was limited since we were in different platoons. We became better friends when we arrived at Ft. Gordon and were roommates for the duration of AIT. She used to walk around the room strutting her stuff and showing us her modeling moves. She always made me laugh. She knew her worth, and she had no problem speaking her mind! I admired her for her courage to stand up for herself and not take crap from anyone. Oh man she gave the drill sgts hell sometimes! We disagreed a lot and fought sometimes just like all roommates do, but we also really enjoyed each others company. After AIT we both ended up at Ft. Hood, but in different Brigades. Since we have the same MOS we ran into each other on occasion, but not too often. About a month before she left on her second tour, I randomly ran into her in a parking lot, and we gave each other a big hug and then sat and talked for at least an hour. It has been awhile since we ran into one another. She told me about things she wanted to do in the future after her deployment, and about the new man in her life. She looked happy and well, like her life was finally going in the direction she wanted it to. It was the last time I saw her. A few months later, I bought a copy of the Army Times and opened it up to find Morgan’s picture staring back at me. This is how I heard the news of her death. All the paper said was that she died of “non combat wounds”, and I wasn’t really sure what that meant. I just hoped that it meant she went quickly and without pain. When I got out of the army early last year, I got involved with the peace movement and the anti-war scene. I started doing some research, and thats how I found so many articles online talking about the Army covering up the deaths of female soldiers. Keisha was mentioned in several of these posts. I read about how the Army had ruled her death a suicide and had removed her brain and heart. I read about how you, her mother, demanded answers from the Army but received none. I read about how the Army had covered up the deaths of several other soldiers. All this research only made me think more and more about Keisha and what exactly happened to her. Just like you, I know she didn’t kill herself. Something happened to her, and I hope for your (and the rest of her loved ones’) sake that you get some answers. I will be thinking about your daughter this memorial day, and I will be thinking of you as well. I’m really glad I stumbled upon this page this morning and got to write this response to you. Mrs. Morgan I have been waiting for 3 years to send you my condolences, and I’m glad that I finally got the opportunity to do so. Please know that I have not forgotten your daughter, and that I too blame the Army for her death. ~ Crystal Colon

  3. Stacy says:

    Mrs. Morgan,

    I would like to echo Miss Colon’s sentiments about Keisha not being forgotten. I too knew her from Basic Training. Her and I were the only two assigned to stay in another platoon’s room. She was my bunkmate. I wish I could say I knew her better, but truthfully, I didn’t know much about her. I was looking up a soldier I knew who had passed and when randomly clicking through the pages, saw Morga’s name and photo. I was shocked to say the least and spent hours researching her passing and read many articles mentioning the mysterious way in which she had gone. I occasionally check up on google to see if there are any new articles related to her death and am sad to find that there aren’t many. You have so much courage. I wish there was more to say than just I’m sorry for your loss, but there really isn’t much more. Best wishes in your search for the truth.

    Stacy

  4. SGT NIKIA BUTLER says:

    Mrs. Morgan,

    You have my deepest sympathy. I was keisha’s recruiter. She was the first person I had the pleasure of putting in the Army. I got out of the Army in 2006 and I tried to find out where Keisha was stationed and was told that she was in Iraq. I had no idea that Keisha had passed away and under such suspicious circumstances. Keisha was a wonderful person. She had such a strong personality and a very sassy, yet underneath she was very warm and caring. I spent a lot of time with Keisha. We had a lot of things in common. She was only 3 years younger than me. After meeting her for the first time, I told her that I would make sure I took special care of her since she shared the same first and middle name with one of my favorite people on the planet, my sister Keisha Marie. Keisha didn’t believe me. She said, ” Is that one of your lines to get me to join the Army?” I laughed and then had to prove it to her by calling my sister on the phone. Lol. I remember it like it was yesterday, Keisha would come into the recruiting station and say, “Corporal Butler, where are we going for lunch today?”. Keisha was so proud when she joined the Army. She wanted to travel and get money for school. She said she wanted to make something of herself. I was glad to be a part of making her dream into her reality. Many times, when I would arrive to pick Keisha up I remember her sashaying out of her apartment building telling me how she could very well be America’s Next Top Model. Keisha had a great sense of humor. There were many days, where I was down, overworked and exhausted at the station, but Keisha would come in the office, look at me and ask, “Whats wrong Corporal Butler?” Then she would turn to the other recruiters and say, “which one of y’all do I need to curse out for messing with my recruiter?” She would always bring a smile to my face. She loved hard and she would fight tooth and nail to protect those who she cared about. Keisha touched my life in a short period of time, but in a profound way. She was so full of life, laughter, and promise. She will truly be missed. Honestly I am still in shock and disbelief that she’s gone. But I find some peace knowing that she can never ever be forgotten. Again, I am so sorry for the loss of such a wonderful life gone far too soon.

  5. Herrera, Juan says:

    Dear Ms. Morgan,

    I’m so sorry for your lost, I know words can do little but I sincerly hope you find comfort in the words posted on here about your beautiful daughter, I stumbled upon this site because I came across something similar about another young beautiful child by the name of Lavena Johnson, who also passed in a suspicous manner, I am so ashamed of how the Army has been covering up these horrible deaths as suicide. I pray for you Mother… that God Almighty will see you through your pain and hurt and that one day you will have closure… I believe in all my heart that you will see your child again in a world that will not know any pain nor hurt or suffering! I Salute your daughter, Spc. Keisha Morgan a true American Soldier and I know she is with the Lord. God Bless you and your family.

  6. Crystal Colon says:

    Mrs. Morgan,
    It has been over a year since you made the initial comment, and I do not know if you have been back to the site since. I just want you to know that I still think about your daughter often, and she is truly missed. I hope time has helped numb your wounds, even though I know they can never be fully healed. Know that your daughter is still in the hearts and minds of many, and that she will never be forgotten.

    Sending my best regards,
    Crystal Colon

  7. Jones,Roger W says:

    RIP snd thank you for your service you will not be forgotten our sister in the military brother hood HOORA.

  8. Eric James says:

    Ms. Morgan,

    Your daughter is gone, but never forgotten. I only knew her briefly (I left the unit a few months before they deployed), but SPC Morgan was a person that was easy to remember. I recall that she was respectful to me but had that certain attitude that I knew would make her successful in the Army.

    I had lived in the D.C. area for a few years, and I remember her talking with fondness about being from there. My funniest memory was when I, as an NCO, was asking her something and she was focused on something else. She had told me about her attending college earlier, so I quipped, “Morgan, did you hear me? Where did you go to college, Gallaudet University?” She gave me that “Negro, please” look and we both laughed. No one got it but us (and you and others who know that it is a school for the deaf).

    SPC Morgan was definitely one of a kind, and I was saddened to hear of her death. I pray that there will be some resolution and with it peace for you and those who love and remember her

  9. crystal colon says:

    Ms. Morgan, it has been several years since your daughters death, but I feel like there are still so many unanswered questions. As someone who served with her in basic training, ait, and at ft. Hood, it pains me to know there has been no conclusion in her case. I dont think your daughter killed herself, and you probably do not either. She loved life too much and would never do such a thing. Morgan was always a rebel of sorts, which is why I liked her. She taught me so much during our time together, and it is tough to know that she is gone. I have felt no closure since I heard about her death, mainly because I failed to believe in the official story line. Mrs. Morgan I know you have pressed on to find the truth about your daughter, and I greatly respect that. If you ever find some answers, please let the world know. There are many out there who care about your daughter and would love to find out the truth about her death. I will never forget the day during my second deployment where i stopped into our tiny px to pick up supplies. I ran into Keisha a few months before we each got redeployed, and she seemed so happy with the direction her life was taking. When I opened up a copy of the army times in this little iraqi px, to my dismay, I saw a lovely picture of Keisha staring back at me under the KIA section. It was a heartbreaking day for me, to know someone for so long and then have then taken away from you. Im sure it was much worse for her family. Since I was active duty at the time I had no other source of information to figure out what happened to her, but I looked for all the information I could find. The official story is bogus, but I have seen little information released that would reveal the truth. Mrs. Morgan if you have this information and wish to keep it private for your families ask, I understand that. If the military is keeping information from you and preventing you from finding the truth, please know that there are veteran allies out here willing to fight for you and help you recieve the information you want. My help is all that I have to offer, which I know can never be enough. Please know that your daughter helped to make a woman out of me (I was 17 when I joined the army and met Morgan in basic training and in need of a role model!) And that I think about u r often. While others are our bbqing and “celebrating” memorial day

  10. crystal colon says:

    Ms. Morgan, it has been several years since your daughters death, but I feel like there are still so many unanswered questions. As someone who served with her in basic training, ait, and at ft. Hood, it pains me to know there has been no conclusion in her case. I dont think your daughter killed herself, and you probably do not either. She loved life too much and would never do such a thing. Morgan was always a rebel of sorts, which is why I liked her. She taught me so much during our time together, and it is tough to know that she is gone. I have felt no closure since I heard about her death, mainly because I failed to believe in the official story line. Mrs. Morgan I know you have pressed on to find the truth about your daughter, and I greatly respect that. If you ever find some answers, please let the world know. There are many out there who care about your daughter and would love to find out the truth about her death. I will never forget the day during my second deployment where i stopped into our tiny px to pick up supplies. I ran into Keisha a few months before we each got redeployed, and she seemed so happy with the direction her life was taking. When I opened up a copy of the army times in this little iraqi px, to my dismay, I saw a lovely picture of Keisha staring back at me under the KIA section. It was a heartbreaking day for me, to know someone for so long and then have then taken away from you. Im sure it was much worse for her family. Since I was active duty at the time I had no other source of information to figure out what happened to her, but I looked for all the information I could find. The official story is bogus, but I have seen little information released that would reveal the truth. Mrs. Morgan if you have this information and wish to keep it private for your families ask, I understand that. If the military is keeping information from you and preventing you from finding the truth, please know that there are veteran allies out here willing to fight for you and help you recieve the information you want. My help is all that I have to offer, which I know can never be enough. Please know that your daughter helped to make a woman out of me (I was 17 when I joined the army and met Morgan in basic training and in need of a role model!) And that I think about u r often. While others are out bbqing and “celebrating” memorial day my thoughts will be with your daughter. Keisha Morgan will be forever missed in my mind. Please take care of yourself Ms. Morgan, and continue searching for the truth.

  11. Nancy Wilson, SFC, USA (Ret.) says:

    RIP SPC Morgan. You will never be forgotten. Women veterans are bonding and growing in numbers all over the nation. We are demanding answers and full disclosure. We will not let one of our sister’s lives be lost in vain. And we will never let one be forgotten.

  12. Nikki says:

    Here it is memorial day and you came to mind. I met you while we were in foster care back in 98 and we became very good friends. We went to cardozo high school together. If I can recall you were in ROTC. Girl I didn’t know you wanted to be in the Army. I just thought of it as an elective to graduate lol. Well I learned about your passing a few years ago, 2012. I am very sorry what happened to you, but proud of what you have become. I hope your family get the closer they deserve. RIP boo!

    Nikki Harris

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